Friday, September 12, 2014

Making Tea

A few years ago I used to have a blog about tea. We had an abundance of tea in one of the kitchen cabinets in a wide variety of flavors. I would make a cup of tea and then give a short review on it. I did some research on each tea I tried like where it originated, how it would traditionally be served, and the way the leaves were cut, etc. Needless to say, I got tired of drinking tea pretty quickly and found out that I can't stand berry flavored herbal tea. Blech!

 This post isn't about that though. This post is just an observation on the very basics of making tea.

You've made a cup of tea before, right? Maybe you're drinking one while reading this post. It's September 12th. Perhaps that's still a little early for tea drinking weather. At any rate, when the weather gets chilly nothing can top a warm cup of tea.

My heating method of choice is the microwave. I bought a mini kettle last year with the intention of boiling water on the stove top for my tea, but I was never patient enough for that. If I'm in a rush I'll put the teabag in before I put the water in the microwave and if I time I'll heat the water first and then watch the tea seep out of the bag as it brews to perfection.

Then you wait.

If I had to wait for water to boil, then for tea to cool, I probably will have gotten some milk and cookies in the meantime and not be thirsty anymore. But, here's the catch with waiting for tea to cool.

Tea only has a peak drinking time of about 10 minutes. This 10 minutes is never completely enjoyed because you can never catch a few of those elusive moments of temperature perfection either because you sipped to soon and then feel, but don't taste, the slightly cooler tea washing over your tongue only moments later or, you got too into a movie, conversation, work, etc. that you missed the final moment when the last few sips of your tea could have been thoroughly enjoyed and you could feel it's warmth radiate to your fingers and toes. Instead you get a bitter mouthful of cold watered down flavor of cow pasture.

So many things have peaks; foliage, songs, careers, life all of which should be through enjoyed.

I never any good at writing conclusions to English compositions and I'm just rambling now anyway. I hope you enjoyed the somewhat satirical post about making tea.

Please, if you're a tea drinker, let me know your favorite kind of tea! I still like to try new flavors now and then. My favorite is Trader Joe's Ginger Pear White Tea.

This is sassafras tea. Homemade from boiling tree roots picked from the yard.




4 comments:

  1. Enjoyed your observations on tea. I'm not much of a tea drinker, but a steaming cup of it sure sounds good now!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I didn't like tea much myself until a few years ago. the is such a variety of flavors I'm sure you'll find one you like someday. I had chocolate tea once and it is SO good!!

      Delete
  2. I love black teas and I love vanilla. Recently I've been able to enjoy two different black tea infused with vanilla and they have been DELISH. Just like my coffee, I love my tea black and bitter. No milk, tea, sugar...just raw how it is. But, I must say, Ginger Pear White sounds amazing!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I drink my tea plain too, without sweeteners but I have to have cream and sugar in my coffee!!

      Delete