Showing posts with label sound of music. Show all posts
Showing posts with label sound of music. Show all posts

Friday, January 16, 2015

Favorite Things Friday || Abba Dabba Honeymoon Part 1


If you haven't heard Carleton Carpenter and Debbie Reynolds sing Abba Dabba Honeymoon in Two Weeks With Love the you should probably go watch it on YouTube right now!: Abba Dabba Honeymoon

My love for musicals didn't really explode until I was in 8th grade and I got the Original Broadway Soundtrack of Annie in my stocking that Christmas. For longer than I can remember, and I have mentioned it multiple times before on this blog (including last Tuesday), I have loved The Sound of Music.

 In 1992 my family visited Stowe, VT, where the von Trapps settled after they fled the Nazi regime in Austria. I have very vague memories of that vacation. We walked on the grounds of the Trapp Family Lodge but were stayed at a campground near by. After I got my drivers license I thought it would be fun to take a road trip, either by myself or with a friend, and spend the day in Stowe. It never happened. When I got engaged there was no doubt in my mind where I wanted to go for the Honeymoon. So this is kind of like Tuesday's post, a reminiscent photo dump, but this time not art related. These pictures do not do justice to how gorgeous the scenery really is.



The mountains are breathtaking. That sound so cliche, but that is the only way to describe them without turning into Baroness Schraeder and saying, "The mountains are magnificent, Georg! Really, magnificent!"

I had to do this without falling. In 1992 I tried to be Maria in the famous opening of The Sound of Music and ended up rolling down the hill, thus creating a family memory that I will never live down. There is a post-roll photo in existence.
We went for a hike the the chapel Werner von Trapp built after returning home from World War 2.

Ringing the bell to "make a joyful noise." 

We drove around the area looking at the mountains, going into shops, and seeing snow for the first time in the season! There was a friendly exchange of frozen ammo.

And of course, when you're this close to the factory, you go!


Sunday, January 11, 2015

Tuesday Cables || Life

Since my life has been quite busy the last few weeks, I am actually sitting here on Sunday night writing a Tuesday post. Inspiration struck early too and that always helps! Though, this is a pretty old project and not something I'm currently working on.

I was going through photos on my personal facebook page and found an old album simply titled "Art." In the album were pictures of school projects from when I was taking graphic design classes in 2011. The project that, by my own judgement, was my most creative but zaniest is my Sound of Music Themed Game of Life.

The Game of Life, well the 1990s version that I played, is a board game where you pick a brightly colored plastic station wagon about an inch long with 6 holes in the top of it. You pick a pink or blue peg person and spin the wheel in the center of the board, which may actually spin your first few tries. Various squares tell you to pick cards telling you your career, salary, and what type of house you live in, etc. There are other squares where you get married and become a parent and add more peg people to your car.

In one art class we were individually assigned a project to design a board game of our own that could be based on a real game of our choosing. I could not pass up the opportunity to create something Sound of Music themed! It ended up as more of a cross between Life and Monopoly since there were no houses to buy or careers to work. I never played it and it has since, unfortunately, gone to the town dump. 

So here it is, looking very atrocious, and with some short explanations on materials and general construction.

Chicken wire and papier-mâché is the secret. This chicken wire was bought specifically to make a papier-mâché mountain. The rest of the roll was generously donated to building an enclosure for the six chickens we had at the time. The flour and water mixture was looked up online. I'm not sure of the ratios, but it really worked well!

I have no "in progress" painting pictures. I used everything we had. Acrylics, fabric paint, gouache, watercolors, and applied them with a variety of sponges, rags, and brushes. The trees are made out of trunk wraps that I cut from an artificial Christmas tree. The awful path, that's just paper. Start is on top of the mountain because that's where Maria was at the beginning of the movie. Finish is at the bottom because the von Trapps (in the movie, anyway) climbed over the mountains to escape the Nazis.

An Edelwiess flower was a theme carried throughout the game, featured on the path, the cards, and as the game pieces. The yellow building that looks like it's going to topple down the mountain is Mondsee Cathedral, where the wedding in the movie took place, and the orange building is Nonnberg Abbey.

A closer view. They're no where near perfect, but I think I was very near crazy to build these out of cereal boxes and make them even this detailed!

Land on a Edelwiess flower, pick an Edelweiss card. Land on a space with a red dash, pick the card with the red writing, and same with the blue dash and blue writing. Red was bad, blue was good. I don't remember the significance of the music note spaces anymore.

Close up of the game pieces and some entertaining game spaces. "Arrive to Abbey late. Lose a turn.", "Teach children to sing.", "Sing to children during thunderstorm.", "Late to dinner.", "Marry Captain von Trapp." I was probably working on this during hours when the majority of the population in my time zone was asleep.



Friday, December 12, 2014

Favorite Things Friday || Girls in White Dresses

This is going to have to be short today because I just cast on a Christmas project and I am such a slow knitter.

In Monday's post I said that I used Edelweiss Pattern's Liesl's Party Dress patter to make my wedding dress. I did not add the lower sleeve puff and I lengthened the skirt. I went to a seamstress to have it fitted because I only started using a machine a few years ago and am just not confident enough to make any important alterations yet.  I had some pictures on a camera card of constructing the entire dress but I can't seem to find them right now! 

This is the full dress before I put in the zipper and without the pearl bead sash. It was so much fun to sew and to see the whole thing come together. I had just guessed at the amount of fabric I would need to lengthen the skirt and I was so surprised when I ended up having the perfect amount with enough scraps left over to make a ring bearer pillow! 


This is just before walking down the aisle. I was trying to pin a broken pendant with an edelweiss flower to my bouquet when my mother snapped this picture. My veil is home sewn as well. Just a couple yards of 108 inch wide tulle and about 8 yards of satin ribbon. My mother in law gave me some pretty silver and pearl combs that I used to hold the veil in my hair. The metal combs didn't hold securely enough to make me feel like the veil wouldn't fall off, so I also ended up using the plastic comb from my mother's wedding veil that she had worn 30 years earlier when she got married at the same church.


I really need to thank Katrina of Edelweiss Patterns who made this beautiful dress pattern (And perhaps even Dorothy Jeakins, the Sound of Music costume designer.) ;) Cheryl, the seamstress who fitted and hemmed my dress was so sweet and full of lots of encouragement and tips for my future sewing!


Friday, July 4, 2014

Favorite Things Friday || When You Read You Begin With A B C:VonTrappSeries Part 4 (Final)

Happy Independence Day!
Blessed is the nation whose God is the LORD... Psalm 33:12a

Today, it's raining. A very welcome blessing after a hot and humid week. My cold is getting better too! 

In the 3 previous posts of the von Trapp Series I've posted about the German language, my own appreciation (obsession ;)) with all things Sound of Music, and the genesis of the 1965 film from book to German movie to Broadway play, to American movie. I hope you've found something interesting in each post. 

Today, I want to talk about the books written by Maria Augusta Trapp. Here is a link to a list of her books on Goodreads.com

The first book of her's that I ever read was Maria, which is an autobiography of her life starting with her birth on a train headed to Vienna up until living in Stowe, VT in 1972. Throughout the book when certain subjects and stories are mentioned you will see "You can read more about this in The Story of the Trapp Family Singers." (Or whichever book of hers the story is told in more detail.)  

I think Maria, though not the first book Maria von Trapp wrote, is an excellent one to start with because it covers her life from the very start. Her style of writing is so easy to read and she has the most wonderful sense of humor! I think a lot of her funny stories are told in The Story of the Trapp Family Singers. This is the book that contains many of the events which are portrayed in The Sound of Music, though the book does differ from the movie quite a bit but it is SO enjoyable to read what this family was really like!  This was the first book she wrote but is great to read second.


The best book to read third in my opinion is A Family on Wheels: Further Adventures of the Trapp Family Singers. It is so much fun to read not just about Austria and America, but about the worldwide concert tours of the Trapp Family Singers. I love reading about Maria's persistence to get permission to sing for a leper colony. 

Fourth and fifth can be bought as two books in one. Yesterday, Today, and Forever and When the King was Carpenter.  Yesterday, Today, and Forever begins with the von Trapps as refugees from Austria and the children (many of them were actually quite grown by the time the von Trapp's immigrated to the US) asking questions about Bethlehem and Jesus. Maria begins to compare fleeing Austria with 9 children to how it must've felt for Joseph and Mary  to go from Bethlehem and live in Egypt when Herod declared that all male babies in Bethlehem were to be killed.

When the King was Carpenter is also a very interesting books in which Maria shares what she has learned in research on Jewish customs and daily life and  really paints pictures with her words describing how Jesus would have lived from infancy to age 30. It is very interesting and so wonderfully written and full of details! I've been trying to get my family to read it but have been unsuccessful so far. I think they assume I love it so much because it's written by Maria von Trapp, but it is such an interesting and informative book!

I really hope this post has piqued someone's interest into finding out about the real von Trapp family, and not just the group of children put together by casting directors. 


Here is a little example of Maria's sense of humor that I mentioned earlier. This is an excerpt from The Story of the Trapp Family Singers.

 -Pages 94 and 95, Maria describes a very funny ordeal with her nurse, Sister Agrosia, in a Vienna Hospital while recovering from a kidney stone operation. She wanted pets to keep her company while she laid on her back for a few weeks, and had to get rid of three chicks, which her husband replaced with a little turtle.-

          "Sister Agrosia was a saintly nun with only one fault: In her childlike innocence she believed every word I said, however silly my stories might be.  She had stirred up in me the urge to find out to what depths her trustfulness would go, which made my stories sillier each day, and still I hadn't reached the limit of her credulity.
          When it became evident that Caspar, Melchior, and Balthazar had to be taken to greener pastures, Georg went to a pet shop and came back radiant.
          "Look what I got you!" and he put a little turtle on my bed. At this very moment Sister Agrosia came into the room.
          "Oh," she said, "what is that?" looking curiously at something she had never seen before in her life.
           Truthfully I answered: "That is a turtle, Sister."
          "A turtle, what is a turtle?" she wanted to know.
           That was bad, all my evil instincts were at work.
          "A turtle is an animal which feeds on the toes of newborn babies," I said looking straight into her eyes.
           This she can't believe, I thought to myself. But I was mistaken.
          "Oh, oh!" Sister said, and looked with horror at the little brown lump on my blanket. "But we'll have to be very careful and keep the door shut."
           I had been given the only vacant room in the whole house, which happened to be right next to the maternity ward, babies being born constantly all around me.
           Cruelly I answered: "That won't help any, Sister, because a turtle can make itself flat like a sheet of paper, crawl under the door and blow itself up outside again."
           Sadly I must confess I was not a bit ashamed of myself at that moment, nor was I the next morning when I heard from eyewitnesses that Sister Agrosia had been seen sitting on a chair outside my door with a stick in her hand while the little turtle slept peacefully on my chest.
           During the next days I did my best to break the spell. I assured Sister Agrosia that I had been mistaken. This was not the wild type of turtle, but a tame one, living on turtle feed."







Friday, June 6, 2014

Favorite Things Friday || Deutsch: Von Trapp Series Part 1

Welcome to a new series to be oh so appropriately posted on Fridays for this month! (I know, my last series was about The Sound of Music play. This is fairly different. It really is one of my favorite things!

 Last week, in the comments I was dubbed a Sound of Music nerd. I take that as a compliment. I saw the movie for the first time when I was about three years old. I have seen the Sound of Music probably hundreds, if not thousands, of times since then, and watched it twice last month. I even got to meet Julie Andrews once! My interest delves much further than the film. I have quite a few of the books written by Maria von Trapp. I also have a book by Agathe von Trapp (The eldest daughter of the 7). Well, anyway, you get the idea. 

While I'm not exactly starting at the very beginning with this post, I'll be starting with a relatively general subject. The German language. No, I don't speak it fluently, though I would love to! What I have learned is mainly from von Trapp related things. From "fräulein" and "auf wiedersehen" in  the Sound of Music to portions of the poem Der Lindenbaum which is sung in Die Trapp Familie, the 1956 German movie that the Broadway play was based on. Of course, I learned Silent Night in German too!

Other German words I know I have learned from a 1912 book I have called "Writing and Speaking German by Paul R. Pope. I'm sure some elements of the language have changed in the past 100 years, but I don't plan on visiting any German seeking countries and trying what I've taught myself anytime soon. I just love the sound of the language. In fact, I wanted to take German in high school but all they offered was French, Spanish, and Latin. I took three years of French then one year of Latin. I sort of wish I had taken four years of Latin. Anyway...

These old books are little treasures on my shelf. The two others, Storm's in St. Jürgen (Storm is the authors last name) and Fulda's Unter Vier Augen, Benedix's  Der Prozess published in 1901 and 1902, respectively. Storm's is, I think, a famous poem and the other book is a couple of plays. The books were used for a German course. There is a German to English glossary in the back of each. Even though I can only understand a few words on each page, there are many words I can make out the pronunciation of, even if I'm not sure what they actually mean. The printing is so pretty. I hope to learn a little more German someday, but for now it's nice to have these old books to look at in my spare time.



What languages do you speak? 
Have you ever been inspired to learn something new because of a favorite book or movie?







Saturday, March 22, 2014

Favorite Things Friday || Carrie Underwood Sound of Music Review Part 4

Edit:
Last Friday  I made a horrible mistake and said there were 5 von Trapp boys and 2 girls. Scratch that reverse it. For someone who has been a fan of all things von Trapp for over 20 years, that was a doozy. There are in fact two boys, five girls. Still...boys should not wear floral lederhosen. Ever.

There were a few other mistakes, I'm sure. I will try my best with proof reading this week!

Actors, Singers, and Dancers

NBC's Sound of Music Live, as a whole was very entertaining and full of talent. While Carrie Underwood is very much a singer without as much legitimate theatre experience as many of her co-stars, I feel like she tackled the leading role of Maria very well considering that Julie Andrews' portrayal is SO well known and Carrie certainly had some big shoes to fill. 



I think the performance I enjoyed the most was Laura Benanti as Baroness Schraeder. She delivered her lines believably and is definitely a talented singer. I think that, although her background is in theater, she was able to tone down the bigness of theatre expressions which definitely worked in her favor for a live television production. Coincidently, Ms. Benanti understudied and then starred in the 1998 Broadway revival of The Sound of Music as Maria von Trapp.

Tony award winner Audra McDonald was wonderful as Mother Abbess. Unfortunately she received some negative tweets about her race and the role she was playing. True, the Reverend Mother during Maria's time at Nonnberg Abbey was not black, but this play is someone's representation of those events. None of it was 100% authentic but that didn't really effect Howard Lindsay and Russell Crouse's story or Rodger's and Hammerstein's songs. This was The Sound of Music, not South Pacific.



People sounding like they were switching in and out of accents was something that bothered me quite a bit. When an actor is going from speaking in a character accent to sounding like their self, essentially they aren't staying in character. On the subject of accents, Admiral von Schrieber was one of the only characters with a German accent. This seems unnecessary and in fact rather cartoony, giving the villain a thick "foreign" accent compared to the rest of the cast. 

At the very end I was a little confused by the second Bible verse that Reverend Mother quoted. Of course the first was Psalm 121:1 which is quoted in the 1965 film version. The next verse quoted on Sound of Music Live was part of Isaiah 55:12 "For ye shall go out with joy, and be led forth with peace: the mountains and the hills shall break forth before you into singing." I'm not sure if this verse was quoted in the original Broadway production but it the words didn't really seem to fit the mood in the play at that moment.
When looked at in context to Isaiah 55:11-13 it makes a little more sense that a family of refugees doing what they feel to be God's will would be feeling peace. I don't think joy was being felt by the characters in the play or by the real von Trapps as they were leaving Austria. 

As much as I found "wrong" with this play I did enjoy being able to see The Sound of Music performed almost true to the original Broadway performance.
I would give the performance of the cast Sound of Music Live 4 out of 5 stars. This was live. They had one chance for everything. Some of the cast were not as experienced as others and I would venture to guess that the majority of viewers were comparing this to the 1965 film where actors were granted as many takes as necessary for scenes against a beautiful Austrian back drop. As a whole the cast and crew of Sound of Music Live did a great job with this massive musical undertaking. 

So Long Farewell
I was going to quote James Cagney as George M. Cohan in Yankee Doodle Dandy(1942) about his new play  titled Popularity. Mr. Cohan urges the audience to "Please, miss it." 

Now, I don't think NBC's Sound of Music should be missed, but appreciated for what it is. A live televised theatre production. It was done well, but to be enjoyed should not be compared with an on location film. Lastly, it should be remembered that Theatre and film can never rewrite the true story of the von Trapp Family.

Thank you so much for reading these reviews. I will admit they show more than a little bias toward the 1965 Sound of Music film in spots. In case you missed the others and would like to start at the very beginning, a very good place to start, they can be found via the links below.:





Friday, March 14, 2014

Favorite Things Friday || Carrie Underwood Sound of Music Review Part 3

  Just so readers are aware, I have not seen the original, complete, stage version of the Sound of Music. I have read 5 books by Maria von Trapp, Agathe von Trapp's book, and Die Trapp Familie, the German movie that the Broadway show was based on. Also, This review is going to have to be in multiple parts. I am not as concise as a professional critic, and I think I have a lot more knowledge on this subject than the average critic would have, so bear with me here. I want to share some things about Maria's books and "how it really happened" along with some insight into the German movie, what I do know of the original  Broadway show, the 1965 film, and tonight's televised production.

That was my intro to these reviews nearly 4 months ago. I've forgotten some of what I thought or felt about the relatively recent Sound of Music Production on NBC last December which starred Carrie Underwood. However, I did take notes which I lost after part 2 of 4 and finally found exactly 1 week ago. 

This new Favorite Things Friday series will first consist of the last three Sound of Music Reviews and after that will feature a few of my favorite things. There could be blogs, Etsy Shops, or things about classic movies, music, etc. You'll just have to wait and see! 

Let's get started on this review.
___________________________________________________

Costumes and Inevitable Comparisons

Something that really stood out to my musical loving mind while watching NBC's Sound of Music Live was the fact that Uncle Max looked incredibly like Rooster from Annie. That was all I could think of every. single. time. he. was. on. screen. I think if he had shaved the pencil mustache it would have improved his character portrayal 200%. The facial hair worked for Richard Haydn in the 1965 film but he also spoke with a British accent. Basically, American+pencil mustache = Rooster Hannigan. I shouldn't fret about it after all the sun will come out tomorrow.

(I will not speak about the head pieces of the singers behind Uncle Max)


The children's play clothes made me roll my eyes. Floral sprays for girls AND the boys. Let's not forget there were only two von Trapp girls and FIVE boys! Kurt looks very much like he's about to cry or throw up. While the gold/tan damask in the movie is not exactly masculine, it is a neutral color and it is not flowers!


 Gold costumes were used in the NBC television production in the scene where Maria teaches Kurt the Laendler. In fact both Maria, Kurt, and the set were the same exact gold, peach, and orange hues in that scene. It was hard to tell where the people ended and the walls began. Perhaps it was to hide the fact Carrie isn't so light on her feet? She did catch her heel on her shirt and fall during one of her concerts...

Another huge thing is the era. The costumes in NBC'S Sound of Music Live were very much mid to late 1940s style. Even the hair styles were from the 1940s, especially Liesl's. The actual real life von Trapps lived out these events beginning in the mid 1920s. Georg and Maria were married on November 26, 1927 and they left Austria in 1938. That said, the condensed era also makes the movie costumes slightly off style as well. I heard years ago, I think in a Christopher Plummer interview he mentioned that Dorothy Jeakins, the costume designer in the 1965 film said of the costumes she made, "If they weren't supposed to zip, they didn't zip." Watch the film again sometime and you'll notice there are no zippers on any of the dresses!

Jeakins' design of the wedding dress in the film was actually fairly similar to Maria von Trapp's own wedding dress. You can see some pictures of the two dresses over on the  Edelwiess Patterns Blog
Carrie Underwood's wedding dress in this television production followed suit, pun intended, with the other costumes and just looked way too modern.

I know someone must've worked hard on the costumes for NBC's Sound of Music Live but it just didn't appear a whole lot of thought was put into it pertaining to the era. It looked as if the few costumes that didn't copy style or color of film costumes were sewn together from some vintage 1940s patterns. Beautiful costumes, but they didn't quite fit even for "The last golden days of the thirties." Assuming the setting of play and film both take place at the same time. Costumes get just 1 out of 5 stars.



Sunday, December 8, 2013

Carrie Underwood Sound Of Music Review Part 2

Songs and Scenes

As I mentioned in part 1, the reason why I wanted to watch "NBC's Sound of Music Live!" was because, according to Julie Andrews in an interview, this performance was supposed to be the original theatre version of the Sound of Music. There are many differences between the theatre and film versions, not just the songs being "out of order" as my brother described it. 

Because I had to work last night, I missed Reverend Mother singing "My Favorite Things" with Maria, "Do, Re, Mi" occurring much earlier in the show than it does in the film, and "Lonely Goatherd" in Maria's room during the thunderstorm. I was glad that I did make it home on time to see both of the songs that Frau Schraeder sings. (Yep, Frau, not Baroness, but we'll touch on that in the next post.)

"How Can Love Survive?" is one of the songs featuring Frau Schraeder that was cut from the film version. It's very theatrical and basically plays off of stories that poor, struggling people are the ones with great romances  and rich people who have "everything" do not have the time or the means they need to fight for love.

Schraeder's other song in the theatre production is "No Way to Stop It." Where she and Captain von Trapp realize their political differences in a less than subtle way and know that a marriage between them is not meant to be. Very different from the 1965 film scene where she graciously steps aside because she sees that the Captain has fallen in love with Maria. The character equivalent of Schraeder in the German movie Die Trapp Familie (1956) doesn't have any songs, just like in the 1965 Sound of Music film.

Something I noticed that was similar to the movie was when the captain, Max, and Maria are discussing whether or not Maria should have dinner with the party guests the underscoring is "How Can love Survive." In the movie, they use it just a tiny bit later, when Max is talking to Elsa right after Maria has left to go back to the abbey because Elsa said the Captain was in love with her. Which brings me to the next point.

In the movie, Baroness Schraeder tells Maria that the Captain is in love with her and in the play, it is Brigitta who shares this information to Maria. What really happened, according to Maria von Trapp herself in her book The Story of The Trapp Family Singers, is sort of a mix of both stage and screen scenes. Princess Yvonne (Elsa Schraeder ;)) notices the captain admiring Maria. She tells Maria the Captain is in love with her, which surprises Maria and makes her want to leave, but the princess convinces her to stay until the wedding so she can look after the children until they go away to school. Sound familiar? Following a few more events and finally a broken engagement with the Princess, the children ask their father if he will marry Maria so she can stay with them. The captain tells his children he would love to marry her but he didn't think she liked him much. The children then go to Maria and tell her that their father doesn't think she likes him much, to which she replies, "Of course I like him." The children then went back to their father to say Maria would marry him. Of course, when Georg walked Into the room where Maria was cleaning a chandelier, spoke to her about marriage she was surprised yet again. This time Maria did leave. She returned to the abbey, this part is accurately portrayed in the 1956 German film, and asked Reverend Mother if it was the will of God that she marry Captain von Trapp. Of course, we all know what Reverend Mother's answer was.

Okay, now on with the show

Lonely Goatherd or Marco Polo. What was with that? The duet with Uncle Max blindfolded playing with the children in the yard. It was just so strange to use the song in that game, I think the film version with Baroness Schraeder passing the basketball with the children is a much more "normal" scenario.

Soon after that scene Maria returns, looking for her life, and Frau Schraeder leaves. In NBC's Sound of Music Live, the Captain and Maria finally reveal their feelings for each other by singing "Something Good." I was very disappointed by this. Had they really used the entire theatre score they would have sung "An Ordinary Couple." The song "Something Good" was written solely by Richard Rodgers, he composed both music and lyrics in the early 1960s when asked to write a new song for the film for Captain and Maria's duet. Oscar Hammerstein had died in 1960. 

I did enjoy the scene where Liesl introduces Maria to Rolf. This occurred when Rolf, delivers a telegram to the house after Georg and Maria are married. In the 1965 film, there was actually a scene that occurred somewhere around the "Do Re Mi" montage when Maria an the children are in town and Liesl introduces Maria and Rolf. It was thought to slow down the film and was ultimately deleted. 



The last scene in the movie that I both enjoyed and slightly cringed at was the concert scene. I thought it was played very well. I enjoyed the transition from the von Trapp villa to the concert hall was really cool, as I've said before, but the concert itself did not really go as well as the transition into it. First, the brass drowned out all nine actors singing the "Do Re Mi Reprise," Then it seemed like Stephen Moyer could have used a lot more practice on the guitar for "Edelweiss," and finally, at the end of "So Long Farewell," his voice nearly drowned out Carrie Underwood altogether. Obviously whoever ran sound was not hearing what the television audience heard. I know I wasn't the only one to notice this because when I went to work on Saturday my boss mentioned the sound during the concert scene and asked if I thought it was off balance too.

Because I have never seen the actual play and am so familiar with the film version, some of the scenes in Sound of Music Live seemed awkward, or disjointed compared to the relative smoothness of the film. I would give Songs and Scenes a 2.5 out of 5. Some things went really well, but when they didn't go well, they just really didn't at all. Plus the added disappointment in the fact that a film song was used to replace a theatre song. I read in "The Sound of Music: a Critical Review of the Changes Made from the Original Stage Play" by James M. Becher that the Rodgers and Hammerstein Estate is limiting aqusition to the songs which I assume was the reason for the change in this performance.


*Photo: Hirsch, Julia Antopol, "The Sound of Music: The Making of America's Favorite Movie", Contemporary Books, 1993
*Copy and Paste link to go to The review by James M. Becher: http://voices.yahoo.com/the-sound-music-critical-review-changes-1273471.html?cat=40

Friday, December 6, 2013

Carrie Underwood Sound of Music Review Part 1

 Just so readers are aware, I have not seen the original, complete, stage version of the Sound of Music. I have read 5 books by Maria von Trapp, Agathe von Trapp's book, and Die Trapp Familie, the German movie that the Broadway show was based on. Also, This review is going to have to be in multiple parts. I am not as concise as a professional critic, and I think I have a lot more knowledge on this subject than the average critic would have, so bear with me here. I want to share some things about Maria's books and "how it really happened" along with some insight into the German movie, what I do know of the original  Broadway show, the 1965 film, and tonight's televised production.


Let's start at the very beginning: Well, actually, I had to work until 8:30 so I saw the show starting at Sixteen Going on Seventeen. We'll start from about there.

When I walked in the house there were commercials on and I asked what everyone was watching. Mom answered, "The Sound of Music." Oh yeah, that special with Carrie Underwood was on tonight,  I almost forgot, but I did want to watch out of, well let's call it slightly less than morbid curiosity. My brother looked at me and said, "The songs are all out of order." They weren't. I knew that they were doing the theatre score/routined version. I heard it right from Julie Andrews in an interview.

Alright, show's back on...

Sixteen Going On Seventeen was pretty good, and I was taking into account the entire time that this was a theatre production, theatre and TV don't usually mix. There is a certain amount of overacting, large gestures and expressions, that have to be done in theatre that just doesn't translate well onto the movie or television screen.  Unless your watching the 1998 London West End production of Oklahoma. *Amazing!!* Anyway...that roll down the hill at the end of Sixteen Going on Seventeen was less than tasteful. However, the show as a whole did not leave me walking away with a jarring feeling and questioning "How could they even do that to this show?!"

The sets and scenery of the show this evening were impressive! There were so many details. From little shrubs in the foreground of 16 Going on 17 to the picturesque mural of the mountains in the background. 

Everything was very beautiful, even the props. The newspaper with the German headline that was about the impending Anschluss (I think) was a nice touch that, along with songs that were cut from the film, added to the intentional political overtones of the theatre version.

 I only have a few qualms about the set, the fountain in the garden of the Trapp estate was slightly cartoony, and the garden in Nonnberg Abbey with giant potted shrubs just seemed so....random. But alas this is the theatre, there are no "on location" opportunities and I have never been to Nonnberg Abbey. I bet they probably do have a garden. And the light projected snow in the final scene. Yes, they're in the mountains, and yes, I could have snowed...I think this was a painfully obvious attempt to add a Christmas feeling given the fact that tonight's airing was competing with NBC's rival ABC on their cable channel, ABC Family's 25 Days of Christmas. But maybe I'm being too analytical.

Well done though. 4 out of 5 stars on Props, Set, and Scenery.

Wednesday, June 6, 2012

Nothing But Some Old Drapes

Captain Von Trapp: Do you mean to tell my that my children have been roaming about Salzburg dressed up in nothing but some old drapes?!

Maria: Mhmm, and having a marvelous time!



No, I didn't make drapes. I made a purse out of an old valance!  (Though I have made wearable items out of curtains before. Thus, fulfilling my dream since age 4 to be Maria von Trapp...)

Anyway...

You know how I said I couldn't sell the things that I sewed? Well I mean it this time. This time it's against the law! Or, well, the "Terms of Use." Here is the site where I found this loverly pattern. After following the link from pinterest, of course. http://www.made-by-rae.com/2009/02/free-buttercup-bag-sewing-pattern/

The fabric used in the pictures on the original site reminded me, slightly, of an old valance I had folded up in my fabric stash.  It was the yellow, I know it was. Also, given the fact that it was raining here for about 5 days straight, I needed to sew something the color of sunshine.
Of course, not having all the materials as usual, I used a regular snap instead of magnetic. Big difference, huh? Thank you to my dad for finally getting it on the purse though. I could have sat there all night tapping away at it. He finally came in my room and told me it sounded like a wood pecker was in there, took the hammer and WHACK! WHACK! WHACK! Perfectly installed snap. :)


Here is the finished result. (The whole thing not just the snap.)

Click to Enlarge Photo.
Two pockets! Perfect for a mirror and bright red lipstick.














                ...and you thought this post was going to be about drapes, didn't you?                                           


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