Showing posts with label tutorial. Show all posts
Showing posts with label tutorial. Show all posts

Saturday, August 30, 2014

One Yard Yoga Waist Skirt Tutorial

What you'll need:
1 yard of 58 inch width knit fabric
Thread
Sewing machine
Ballpoint needle
Measuring tape
Waist measurement
Hip measurement

This skirt is pretty simple to sew and should work for hip sizes up to about 50 inches. The smaller the hip size, the closer the gathers will be. I hope my tutorial explain the process well enough. This skirt can easily be completed within a couple of hours. 

I love that this skirt can be worn at the waist or just above the hips and that it has absolutely no elastic band! The stretch of the knit is enough to make an extremely comfortable waistband!

Start by measuring around the narrowest point of your waist and the widest part of your hips. Write down your measurements.

1. Measure 12 inches down on fold. (This is the height of your waistband). Divide your waist measurement by 2. Measure across from fold. (This is the width of your waistband). Cut.


2. With right sides together, sew up the end opposite the fold. 


5. Cut 12inch section remaining from cutting out waistband from the remaining fabric so you have a straight edge again. Save for scraps.


6. With right sides together, a sew remaining portion of fabric together on selvage edges. I zigzag stitched my edges here after straight stitching for a little extra security in the seam.


7. Thread a hand sewing needle with a length of thread about 4 inches more than your waist measurement. Tie the thread about a 1/2 inch from raw edge and as close to the seam as you can get it. (You will want to do this on the end of your skirt that has the more uneven corners at the seam since you won't be hemming the bottom.)


8. Gather the edges by making basting stitches between 1/4 and 1/2 inch long around the entire top of the skirt.


9. Divide your hip measurement by 2. Before your tie off the other end of your thread, lay skirt flat and pull thread until the width matches this measurement. Hello!


10. Tie off thread securely and then straight stitch around with your machine to secure the gathers, evenly distributing them as you go.


11. Fold waistband over, wrong sides together.

12. Place waist band inside of skirt, with the wrong side of your skirt facing out. Stretch waistband to fit skirt and pin in place.

13. Stretch while sewing to match up all three raw edges. Zigzag stitch around.


Enjoy your new skirt!


I guess I got a little lazy with the picture taking for steps 11 and 12. Oops! 

As always, feel free to comment or email me (thewizardofoddsandends (at) gmail (dot) com) with any questions about the tutorial and I will do my best to clarify any areas that seem confusing. I would love to see your skirt if you make one!! @wizofoddsnends on twitter and @thewizardofoddsandends on IG.

Tuesday, June 10, 2014

Tuesday Cables || Asymmetrical Ruffle Button Down Shirt Tutorial

Well, that was a mouthful of a title. I wasn't too sure what I'd be posting today, but I had made this shirt before from a tutorial I found probably four or five years ago and can't seem to locate now. I've been looking for a black button down shirt and couldn't find one in a style I liked so I thought it would be fun to write out my own tutorial for this shirt refashion! (If anyone stumbles across the original tutorial I'd love to know so I can link it here.)

First, of course, start out with a plainly styled button down shirt. I just bought this one, specifically for this tutorial, at a thrift store today for $2.99. It had gathering under the bust, but it worked out alright, so there is a little leeway with design.

1. Try your shirt on and mark about half an inch longer than where you want the sleeve to end. Button all buttons and fold the shirt in half matching up the shoulder seams. Pin in place if necessary. Cut sleeves.
2. Next, cut the cuffs and seams from the sleeves you just cut off. 

3.Lay sleeves flat, you should have two pieces of fabric that now look like the top photo.
4. Cut off the narrower side of the fabric. You won't need this.
You should now have a 2 fairly square pieces of fabric. The edges can be a little rough because you won't be able to tell one you make the ruffles.

5.Cut your fabric squares into strips approximately 1.5 inch wide. You will probably end up with one strip at the end that tapers to a point. You won't need that one and probably won't end up needing all of the strips you cut either.

6. Baste strips and gather as you go along. Be sure not to gather strips too tightly. Leave enough room for adjusting the ruffles later on. 
7.When joining strips overlap about a quarter of an inch and be sure at least one basting stitch goes through the overlap.

To give you an idea of how tightly to gather, my fabric strips were about 12 inches long. When I gathered them it took 3 strips to make a 9 inch ruffle. I used 3 strips for the ruffle closest to the buttons, 2 strips for the middle ruffle, and 1.5 strips for the shortest ruffle.
8. Lay the ruffles on your shirt so you can decide how much you want to stagger them or how far apart you want to place them. It's okay if the tops are a little staggered too.

9. Pin ruffles to shirt, making sure to untwist them as you pin, and try on shirt with collar down to be sure that the collar covers the top of the ruffles in the way you would like it to look.
10. Sew a straight stitch down the center of each ruffle.

11. Trim the longer frays. You may have to trim them after the first couple of washes as well.
12. Hem sleeves and then you have finished your shirt!

The sun set while I was refashioning my shirt, so here is the lovely finished product brought to you by a bright camera flash. Note to self: make sure to button ALL the buttons next time. I only missed one. After the first three buttons the rest the button placket is hidden.

Happy sewing! :)








Tuesday, April 8, 2014

How to Wear a Button Down Shirt as a Skirt | Tutorial

Recently I did an online challenge where the bloggers who took part had to wear a button down shirt three days in a row and style it differently each day. On day three I decided to wear my shirt as a skirt. You can see that style [here!] There are quite a few similar tutorials on line, this is my version. It makes more of a high waisted skirt that is good for layering. Of course, these are just guidelines, you can change things up a little and style it your own way; shirt tucked in or worn over it, with a belt, as an underskirt for extra length, etc. The usually works best with a plain button down shirt that's a size or two above what you'd regularly wear.

Underneath each set of photos the steps are listed with corresponding numbers.


1. Make sure the collar is folded over the shirt so that it's on the inside.
2. Find out which button and corresponding buttonhole fit best around your natural waist.

3. Place the top edge of the shirt at your natural waist. Make sure the collar is still turned inside.
4. Button shirt so that it fits comfortably around your waist. Button the rest of the way down.
5. Pull the yoke up. (The part that would go across your shoulders on the back.)
6. Fold yoke down and smooth.

7. Pull right sleeve across front and around to back.
8. Tuck sleeve into the ”waistband" that you made from folding over the yoke. (Don't worry if it's a little loose, that will be taken care of in the next step.
9. Repeat steps 7 and 8 with left sleeve.

10. Finished back. You'll want to check in huge mirror to make sure everything looks smoother than mine! 
11. Finished front.

Just incase you've noticed that it looks like I'm leaning slightly to the left. That's not the shirt, the camera, or your eyes playing tricks. That's just my slight spine curvature. 


So, there you go.  Shirt as a skirt! 






Wednesday, November 27, 2013

My First Tutorial...

Since I can't post any pictures of Christmas presents, and that is basically all I am working on at the moment, (Whilst falling way behind on my 365 squares. Ugh.) I have decided it was high time to post a tutorial here and my camera decided it was high time for the batteries to die. Well, I'm done complaining. At least I still have something I can take pictures with.

Thanksgiving is in just a few short hours and I suppose that means I'm late, by retail store standards, getting into the Christmas spirit. The fun thing about working at a children's library is decorating for each season and the accompanying holidays. We haven't deecorated for Christmas yet, but we've been preparing...with discarded books! I'm sure you can find this tutorial elsewhere on the Internet, but I can guarantee you that their photos won't have that fuzzy vintage look that invokes feelings of nostalgia from Christmases past.

Here is it folks, the Christmas Tree Book:

Fold the page over so that the top edge is even with the spine of the book.

Fold page again so that the first folded edge is even with spine.

Fold bottom corner of page even with bottom edge of the book and tuck the corner inside of the triangle.

Repeat...

*Note: I made my tree out of four separate sections of 16 pages and glued the sections together. You can make your tree with as many or as few sections/pages as you like for slightly different looks. It's fun to try with different size books too!










Saturday, September 14, 2013

Men's Shirt to Skirt

You've probably seen "men's shirt to skirt" tutorials on Pinterest and that is exactly not where I found the tutorial to make this skirt. I actually googled "men's shirt to skirt" and his was the eighth result on the page. I picked it because I liked the way it looked better than all the results ahead of it and I had a skirt that I thought would make a good template.

The tutorial is right here:

I loved the tutorial. A LOT of pictures and just enough written instructions that I knew what I was supposed to be doing if was confused by a picture. Does anyone else do that? I know I can't be the only crafter that goes mostly by pictures and not written instructions.

Before I started I managed to snap one quick before picture so I actually have what will pass as a before/after photo for this project! Now, let me explain a little. The shirt/skirt is 100% cotton mint chambray. NOT WHITE! My camera kind of decides to make each picture a different color which can be a cross between amusing and frustrating, depending upon what I'm trying to take a picture of. Pardon the wrinkles on the skirt and scraps in the background. I had literally just finished sewing. Excuse the sock as well. That diffuses the flash so I don't get a glare across the mirror. So professional. Anyway, less writing, more picture.


And, just an example of what I mean about my camera sort of having a mind of its own when it comes to the color of each picture, here's a lovely yellow-orange tinted photograph. Hello 1973!